The force acting on a current-carrying conductor in a magnetic field

Magnetic field plays a significant role in electricity generation and utilization. This force is denoted by the symbol B.

The force acting on an electric current-carrying conductor in a magnetic field is given by the following equation.

A conductor carrying a current experiences a force tending to move the conductor in the direction of the magnetic field.

The force experienced by a current-carrying conductor is called electromagnetic induction. It can be applied to any conductor, regardless of its geometry or material.

In this section, the force acting on a current-carrying conductor in a magnetic field is explained. In a magnetic field, the electron velocity is always perpendicular to the plane of oscillation of the magnetic field.

This activity explains what happens when an electron moves through a non-uniform magnetic field. Using signs as well as drawings, students will be able to understand how an electron’s velocity changes in relation to the plane of oscillation of the magnetic field.

There are numerous ways that this force can be used by engineers and scientists. The most common way is for power generation.

A current-carrying conductor is anything that conducts electricity and carries charge. The most common current-carrying conductors are wires, and the magnetic field produced by the wire acts on a current-carrying conductor.

A conductor’s velocity changes with its direction in a magnetic field. The force exerted on it has to do with the speed of the conductor and its perpendicular distance from the line of magnetic flux.

In order to understand how a current carrying conductor moves, you need to know about some basics of magnetism. Here are some of them:

The force on a current-carrying conductor due to the presence of a magnetic field is given by the Biot-Savart law. It helps us understand how an electrical current flows through wires and conductors.

A conductor is said to be in free space when no other magnetic fields exist.

Current carrying conductor is the one that carries current in a certain wire or a device. They are used in many applications in electrical engineering where currents are to be carried in wires or devices. Current-carrying conductors could be copper, aluminium, or steel.

The force acting on a current-carrying conductor in a magnetic field is that of the Lorentz Force law of Electromagnetism, which states that “the force exerted on a charged particle by a magnetic field is directly proportional to both the strength and direction of that field.”

The other two types of forces acting on an electric conductor are caused by an electrostatic potential difference (voltage) and ohmic resistance.

In this section, we will discuss about the force acting on a current-carrying conductor in a magnetic field.

In this section we first need to understand what is a current and what is a flow of electrons as it moves through a conductor. To understand that let’s go back in time.

The history of electricity has been traced back to the ancient Egyptians who invented an electrical device which would be used for lighting earthenware pots. The device was made by inserting a rod into two conical cups of metal, one at the top and another at the bottom of the earthenware pot. A large piece of amber, with many grains in it, was placed between these two cups to conduct electricity from one cup to another across an air gap left by inserting an empty space between them.

The force acting on a current-carrying conductor in a magnetic field is given by the Lorentz force. It is the force that electromagnetic fields exert on other electric charges or magnetic charges.

Electromagnetic forces are responsible for everything we do with electricity, including holding a magnet to a refrigerator door, and holding metal to metal.

The Lorentz force equation in terms of magnetic field strength and distance is:

Current-carrying conductors, like wires and metal rods, experience forces when placed in a magnetic field. The three most important forces are the Lorentz force (due to the magnetic field), gravitational force (when placed near a heavy object), and tension as shown in the following diagram.

The Lorentz force is due to the electrons being pushed around by their magnetic spins, which are what dictate electricity. The tension is just due to gravity pulling on one side of the conductor while only pushing on one other side.